Middlemarch

Hello Everyone and Welcome Back to The Boss Book Club!

Today we will be looking at the classic novel Middlemarch, originally published in 1871-2 by English novelist Mary Anne Evans, better known by her pseudonym George Eliot- a name she adopted at the commencement of her writing career.

I admit that, for whatever reason, I had up until this point avoided classic female writers. To my shame, I confess I’ve never read anything by the Bronte sisters, or Jane Austen, or anything in that field. Being a bit of a tomboy by nature, I thought I wouldn’t enjoy books with a romantic emphasis and find them “too girly.” I assumed Middlemarch would be all Lords and Ladies without much substance about the human condition.

I was very very wrong, and am glad that I got over my own prejudice to read Middlemarch.

Middlemarch is one of the most intelligently written novels I’ve ever read. It hides its deep and insightful look into the human condition under the broad heading of “a study of provincial life.” Middlemarch is the name of an English town, and the novel explores the lives of the families and couples that live there- it takes the reader into the intimate life of a number of central characters and details for us their ambitions, their beliefs and their hopes, then surely and relentlessly, shows us how luck, poor choices and life in general can get in the way of everyone’s best efforts. It shows us how people compromise, how people can improve themselves or become worse, and shows how big an impact marriage can play in a person’s life. Some characters serve as cautionary tales whilst others serve as inspiration. Every one of them is relatable in a deeply human way- the careers, technology and language may be different now, but you will see your neighbours and yourself in the characters in this book.

This book came at an opportune point in my life. I’ve been married less than a year, and this book gives you a lot to think about in terms of what makes a marriage successful, the sacrifices involved, and how one person’s choices, both their successes and their mistakes, can impact on the other half of the couple. The themes in the novel made me reflect on what I want to contribute to the marriage, and put my expectations from the commitment into a realistic perspective.

The themes in this book are universal, and Eliot’s insight into human nature is astounding. This book is as relevant now as it was over a hundred years ago, and I have no doubt, will be just as relevant in 100 years time.

This novel is not action packed as such- no bombs go off, no shots fired, but if you invest the time, slowly but surely, it will help you to understand yourself, and people in general, a lot better. This book is big, and whilst I believe anyone could read it and get something out of it, if you are married or are getting married soon, this book will serve to provide something extra- as marriage is one of it’s main subjects.

 

Thank you for joining us at The Boss Book Club!

 

Happy Reading Bosses!

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Over the Top and Back: The Tom Jones Autobiography

Hello Everyone and Welcome Back to The Boss Book Club!

I trust you have been enjoying your own reading adventures. This week I will be reviewing the one and only autobiography of the one and only Tom Jones. I received this book as a gift from my husband- we’re both big Tom Jones fans. We saw him perform live and he was fantastic, an incredible voice, and a warm and energetic entertainer that obviously loves what he does…

But what’s his book like?

This book ticks all the essential boxes for an autobiography- it gives a detailed account of his family and childhood life, and all the steps that lead to his successful career. It details the places he played, how he signed his first record deal, and the television and recording opportunities that put him at the top. The book goes into detail about his love of different music styles and the musicians that inspired him, as well as the diverse array of famous faces he’s rubbed shoulders with- including some special stories about his interactions with such people as Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley and even the Queen. These stories are great and make you appreciate the hard work and determination that goes into building a career with no guarantees, and give you an insight into the glitz and glamour of being top of the charts.

Where this book differs is that Tom Jones also goes into a lot of detail about the downsides of his career. He talks a lot about some of the bad decisions he’s made, the regrets that he has about who he’s worked with, the places he stayed at too long, and the songs or performances he didn’t like. It’s hard to read these parts sometimes- he seems a bit too hard on himself. It reads  like he’s being defensive- particularly when he’s justifying to the reader why he chose to play Vegas for so many years rather than work hard on his recordings. He contradicts himself sometimes- on the one hand saying that Vegas was a great time and a steady paycheck, but at the same time lamenting that it gave him the label of a “Vegas Performer”, which he states he never thought fit what he did. It seems a bit condescending to try and distance yourself from a venue that has given you so much success, money and, well, employment, but then resent it and try and distance yourself from it at the same time. Tom spends a fair bit of time in this book trying to convince the reader he is a legitimate musician.

Tom, you don’t need to do that!

You don’t have a succesful career that spans sixty years without being a legitimate, dedicated, talented musician. And that’s the most frustrating bit in reading this book- he justifies where there is no need. You wouldn’t be reading this book unless you already know that Tom Jones is awesome!

 

All in all, this book is great for any Tom Jones (of course) or music fan. It will add value to your collection.

 

Thank you for joining us this week- please let us know if you’ve read any great autobiographies lately in the comments section.

 

Happy Reading Bosses!